Kahana Valley State Park

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Ahupua'a O Kahana State Park (formerly Kahana Valley State Park) is located on the windward side of O'ahu, between Kane'ohe and La'ie, and 26 miles from Honolulu. Kahana is a relatively unspoiled valley, and one of only a few publicly owned ahupua'a, or ancient Hawaiian land division, in the state. An ahupua'a includes lands from the mountains to the sea (mauka-makai), encompassing all of the resource zones needed for subsistence. The ahupua'a of Kahana encompasses almost 5,300 acres, ranging from sea level at Kahana Bay to 2,670 feet at Pu'u Pauao on the crest of the Ko'olau mountains. Kahana is one of the wettest valleys on O'ahu. Overcast skies and showers are frequent, with an average annual rainfall of 75" along the coast to 300" at the back of the valley. Temperatures can range from the mid-60s to the mid-80s.

There are two hiking trails available to the public. Both are relatively easy walking, but trails may be muddy. No permits are required, and detailed trail maps are available at the Orientation Center.

Kapa'ele'ele Ko'a and Keaniani Lookout Trail is a one mile long loop trail that begins at the Orientation Center and takes about one hour. The trail passes two cultural sites and offers stunning views of Kahana Bay.

Nakoa Trail is named for the koa trees found along this 2.5 mile loop trail through a tropical rain forest. The loop hike takes about 2 hours. The total length of the hike is 5 miles from the Orientation Center. The trailhead can be reached by following the main road up the valley. This trail crosses Kahana Stream twice. Fruit picking when in season.

There are extensive remnants of Hawaiian culture in the valley, including a heiau (religious temple), ko'a (fishing shrines), fishponds, house sites, stone-walled enclosures, 'auwai (irrigation channels), agricultural terraces, walls and planting areas. While many of these sites are inaccessible to the public, Kapa'ele'ele Ko'a and Keaniani Kilo (lookout) are accessible via a trail on the west side of the valley mouth. From the kilo, the kilo i'a, or fish watcher, spied schools of akule in the bay and signaled to valley residents who would collectively net them. Huilua Fishpond, the most impressive site in the valley, and presently under restoration, can be visited from the east side of the bay.

Minimum Time Needed

2 Hours

Hours

Daily during daylight hours

Admission Fee

Free

Location


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URL

http://www.hawaiistateparks.org/parks/oahu/ahupuaa.cfm

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